COMMUNITY OUTREACH

Nurture Each Other in Faith

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BOY SCOUTS

For more than a century Troop 3 has brought the excitement of Scouting to young people in the Salem area. Whether it’s finding a new discovery over the next ridge along a trail or pitching a tent and building a campfire under the stars, the troop’s Scouts have found adventures in real life that no video game can match.

 

While Troop 3 Scouts regularly take advantage of their local surroundings for hiking, camping, fishing and other outdoor activities, their explorations are not limited to Northeast Ohio. In 2019 the troop visited the historic battlefields of Gettysburg, learning about the events that led up to the Civil War and its aftermath. Future trips will take the Scouts to the natural wonders of Niagara Falls.

Troop 3 was chartered by the First Presbyterian Church of Salem on Feb. 21, 1910, just 13 days after the Boy Scouts of America was incorporated. George Meiser was the  troop’s first Scoutmaster. Since that time the troop has continuously maintained its charter, which means that while other troops may have earlier charter dates, no other troop in Ohio can claim the unbroken 111-year status of Troop 3. In addition to its status as the oldest continuously chartered troop in the state of Ohio, Troop 3 holds the distinction of being the third oldest troop in the United States to continuously maintain its charter.

Recently, the troop witnessed another historic milestone, as the Scouting program was opened up to girls for the first time at the national level. First Presbyterian Church was the first charter organization in Salem, and one of the first in Buckeye Council, to welcome female members by founding Troop 3 Girls Troop. As everyone knows, the highest award in Scouting is the rank of Eagle Scout. In its 111-year history, Troop 3 has produced 54 Eagle Scouts, and more are in the way, including Salem’s first female Eagle Scouts.

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QUILTERS

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United Quilt Guild
by Lois Dunn

While FPC does not have an active quilters circle and has not for years, quilting is still very important to members of the Guild who meet at our church.

For years prior to 2008, FPC ladies who quilted met each Thursday for quilting, fellowship, and a covered dish lunch. As many as 15 members worked diligently on quilting beautiful bed covers. The money received from making these quilts was given to the church in a special fund.

Due to the death of quilters and decreased interest in hand quilted quilts, fewer quilts were brought in for quilting, and the “new” quilting machines cut weeks of work into perhaps a two day finish time. Eventually only three or four quilters were left to finish the last quilt. When my Mother died in 2009, “The Quilters” ceased to exist.

However, the United Quilt Guild has met in Fellowship Hall for the past few years. Originally started at the United High School as part of an education program, the group decided to find a more convenient meeting place. The group meet the first Tuesday evening of each month, but during 2021 the group has not. But we are looking forward to returning to FPC.

A meeting and a program are presented each month. We have “Challenge Night” each June (this year, 2021, in September) and a large quilt show every other year – this time in 2022 due to COVID in 2021. We have smaller groups also Day Groups every other Friday. Charity quilts every other Thursday (opposite week) and Applique Group which will start again soon in a private home. Charity Quilts meet at Westville Roller Rink as does the Guild.

All questions are welcome – Lois Dunn

Volunteers Packing Food

Salem Community Pantry
by Gail Tetlow

First Presbyterian Church of Salem supports the Pantry by including it in our budget and also by church members donating money and/or non-perishable items which are collected in out Fellowship Hall and taken to the Pantry.

The Pantry serves people in the Salem area once a week currently with (due to the pandemic) boxes of food put into the trunk of their cars. The Pantry Board hopes to be able to be fully open sometime between early summer and early fall.